Column etymology

Dataset List of counties in Texas - List

Type : text

Keywords : etymology

Dataset

Data row number Etymology
1 Kenneth Lewis Anderson (1805–1845), the last vice president of the Republic of Texas
2 Richard Andrews (1800–1835), the first Texan soldier to die in the Texas Revolution
3 A Hainai Native American woman who assisted early Spanish missionaries, whom they called 'Little Angel' (Spanish: Angelina)
4 Aransas Bay, named in turn for an early Spanish fort; this support was supposedly named in turn for a Spanish palace Aránzazu, possibly related to the Sanctuario de Aránzazu. (Arantzazu is Basque for 'place of thorns')
5 Branch Tanner Archer, a commissioner for the Republic of Texas
6 One of several Texas pioneer families, although it is not certain which one
7 The Spanish word for 'boggy'
8 Stephen F. Austin (1793–1836), known as the Father of Texas
9 Peter James Bailey III, a soldier and defender of the Alamo
10 Bandera Pass, named in turn for the Spanish word for 'flag'
11 Baron Felipe Enrique Neri de Bastrop, the Dutch settler who provided essential help to Stephen F. Austin in obtaining his original land grants
12 Henry Weidner Baylor, a surgeon in the Texas Rangers during the Mexican–American War
13 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. (1787–1853), a secretary of state of the Republic of Texas
14 Peter Hansborough Bell, the third governor of Texas (1849–1853)
15 San Antonio de Béxar, the major presidio in Mexican Texas, named in turn for the San Antonio River and the Spanish viceroy's family, who were Dukes of Béjar in Spain
16 The Blanco River. (Blanco is Spanish for 'white')
17 Gail Borden, Jr. (1801–1874), businessman, publisher, surveyor, and inventor of condensed milk
18 The Bosque River. (Bosque is Spanish for 'wooded')
19 James Bowie (1796–1836), the legendary knife fighter who died at the Battle of the Alamo
20 Brazoria, Texas, an early port on the Brazos River
21 The Brazos River
22 Henry Percy Brewster (1816–1884), a secretary of war for the Republic of Texas and soldier in the Civil War
23 Andrew Briscoe (1810–1849), a signatory of the Texan Declaration of Independence and soldier during the Texan Revolution
24 James Abijah Brooks, a Texas Ranger and state legislator
25 Henry Stevenson Brown, a commander at the Battle of Velasco
26 Edward Burleson (1798–1851), a general of the Texas Revolution and Vice President of the Republic of Texas
27 David Gouverneur Burnet, the first president of the Republic of Texas (1836)
28 Mathew Caldwell, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and soldier during the Texas Revolution
29 John C. Calhoun, the seventh vice president of the United States (1825–1832)
30 James Hughes Callahan, a soldier during the Texas Revolution
31 Ewen Cameron, a soldier during the Texas Revolution killed during the Black Bean Episode
32 John Lafayette Camp (1828–1891), a Texas state senator
33 Samuel Price Carson, the first secretary of state of the Republic of Texas (1836–1838)
34 Lewis Cass (1782–1866), a senator from Michigan, who had favored the annexation of Texas to the United States. Named Davis County 1861-1871
35 Henri Castro (1786–1865), a French consul general for the Republic of Texas and founder of a colony in Texas
36 Thomas Jefferson Chambers, lawyer and surveyor who helped to resolve land disputes for Americans in Mexican Texas
37 The Cherokee Native American tribe
38 George Campbell Childress (1804–1841), one of the authors of the Texas Declaration of Independence
39 Henry Clay, U.S. Senator from Kentucky and ninth secretary of state of the United States (1825–1829)
40 Robert E. Cochran (1810–1836), a defender of the Alamo
41 Richard Coke, the 15th governor of Texas (1874–1876)
42 Robert M. Coleman, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and soldier at the Battle of San Jacinto
43 Collin McKinney (1766–1861), an author of the Texas Declaration of Independence and the oldest person to sign it
44 James Collinsworth, a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and first chief justice of the Republic of Texas. (spelling differs due to an error in the bill creating the county)
45 The Colorado River of Texas (Colorado is Spanish for 'red')
46 The Comal River. (Comal is Spanish for 'basin')
47 The Comanche Native American tribe
48 The Concho River. (Concho is Spanish for 'shell')
49 William Gordon Cooke, a soldier during the Texas Revolution
50 James Coryell, a frontiersman and Texas Ranger who was killed by Native Americans
51 George Washington Cottle, who died defending the Alamo
52 William Carey Crane, a president of Baylor University
53 David Crockett (1786–1836), the legendary frontiersman who died at the Battle of the Alamo
54 Stephen Crosby, a Texas Land Commissioner
55 David Browning Culberson, a lawyer, U.S. Congressman, and soldier in the Civil War
56 James Wilmer Dallam, a lawyer and newspaper publisher who had a close association with the Supreme Court of Texas
57 George Mifflin Dallas, the eleventh vice president of the United States (1845–1849)(Disputed)
58 Nicholas Mosby Dawson, a soldier of the Texan Revolution and victim of the Dawson Massacre
59 Erastus 'Deaf' Smith (1787–1837), a scout during the Texan Revolution
60 Its triangular shape, much like the Greek letter Delta
61 John Bunyan Denton (1806–1841), a preacher, lawyer, and soldier killed during a raid on a Native American camp
62 Green DeWitt, an empresario who founded an early colony in Texas
63 J.A. Dickens, who died at the Battle of the Alamo
64 Philip Dimmitt, a major figure in the Texas Revolution
65 Stockton P. Donley, a frontier lawyer and Texas Supreme Court justice
66 Burr Harrison DuVal (1809–1836), a soldier in the Texas Revolution who died in the Goliad Massacre
67 William Mosby Eastland, a soldier during the Texas Revolution
68 Mathew Ector (1822–1879), a Confederate general during the Civil War
69 Haden Edwards (1771–1849), empresario and filibuster who led the Fredonian Rebellion
70 Richard Ellis (1781–1846), president of the convention that produced the Texas Declaration of Independence
71 Neighboring Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, formerly called El Paso del Norte as it served as the pass north from central Mexico to the settlements of New Mexico
72 George Bernard Erath, an early surveyor and a soldier at the Battle of San Jacinto
73 The Falls on the Brazos
74 James Walker Fannin, Jr. (1805–1836), the commander of the Texans killed in the Goliad Massacre
75 Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (1757–1834), the French-born general and hero of the American Revolutionary War
76 Samuel Rhoads Fisher (1794–1839), a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and secretary of the Navy under the Republic of Texas
77 Dolphin Ward Floyd, who died defending the Alamo
78 Robert Levi Foard, an attorney and Confederate major in the Civil War
79 A blockhouse positioned in a bend of the Brazos River
80 Benjamin Cromwell Franklin (1805–1873), a judge and Texas State Senator
81 A type of peach grown in the area
82 The Frio River (Frío is Spanish for 'cold')
83 James Gaines, merchant and signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence
84 Bernardo de Gálvez, Spanish governor of the Louisiana Territory (1777–1785)
85 José Antonio de la Garza, pioneering settler and first Mayor of San Antonio
86 Robert Addison Gillespie, a merchant, Mexican–American War soldier, and Texas Ranger
87 George Washington Glasscock (1810–1868), an early Texian settler, businessman, soldier, and state representative
88 Its county seat, named in turn as an anagram of Miguel Hidalgo, the inspirational figure behind the Mexican War of Independence
89 Its county seat, named in turn for Coahuila y Tejas governor Rafael Gonzales
90 Peter W. Gray (1819–1874), a lawyer, state senator, and soldier in the Civil War
91 Peter Wagener Grayson, an attorney general of the Republic of Texas
92 John Gregg (1828–1864), a Confederate general during the Civil War
93 Jesse Grimes (1788–1866), a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and early settler of the future county
94 The Guadalupe River, named in turn for the Mexican spiritual icon Our Lady of Guadalupe
95 John C. Hale, a lieutenant killed in action at the Battle of San Jacinto
96 Warren DeWitt Clinton Hall, a secretary of war for the Republic of Texas (1836)
97 James Hamilton Jr., governor of South Carolina (1830–1832) who gave financial aid to the Republic of Texas
98 John M. Hansford, a Texas state representative and judge
99 Bailey Hardeman, the first secretary of the treasury for the Republic of Texas, and his brother Thomas Jones Hardeman, state representative and judge
100 The Hardin family, earliest settlers of Liberty County