Bound for Glory Series - Results - 2013 -      These wrestlers qualified for the final matches.     Winner of the tournament

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Structured data parsed from Wikipedia.      These wrestlers qualified for the final matches.           Winner of the tournament

Data Source : WIKIPEDIA
Number of Data columns : 4 Number of Data rows : 12
Categories : economy, demography, politics, knowledge

Dataset

Data row number Rank Wrestler Points Matches

Download the dataset to see the full list of 12 entries

Data Columns

Name Description Data Type
Rank text
Wrestler text
Points integer
Matches integer

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Demographics of Russia - Ethnic groups - Historical perspective

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Historical perspective       The ethno demographic structure of Russia has gradually changed over time. During the past century the most striking change is the fast increase of the peoples from the Caucasus. In 1926, these people composed 2% of the Russian population, compared to 6.5% in 2010. Though low in absolute numbers, the Siberian people also increased during the past century, but their growth was mainly realized after WW II (from 0.7% in 1959 to 1.2% in 2010) and not applicable to most of the small peoples (less than 10,000 people). Peoples of European Russia Peoples of European Russia The relative proportion of the peoples of European Russia gradually decreased during the past century, but still compose 91% of the total population of Russia in 2010. The absolute numbers of most of these peoples reached its highest level in the beginning of the 1990s. Since 1992, natural growth in Russia has been negative and the numbers of all peoples of European Russia were lower in 2010 than in 2002, the only exceptions being the Roma (due to high fertility rates) and the Gagauz (due to high levels of migration from Moldova to Russia). Several peoples saw a much larger decrease than can be explained by the low fertility rates and high mortality rates in Russia during the past two decades. Emigration and assimilation contributed to the decrease in numbers of many peoples. Emigration was the most important factor for Germans, Jews and Baltic peoples (Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians). The number of Germans halved between 1959 and 2010. Their main country of destination is Germany. The number of Jews decreased by more than 80% between 1959 and 2010. In 1970, the Soviet Union had the third largest population of Jews in the world, (2,183,000 of whom 808,000 with residence in Russia), following only that of the United States and Israel. By 2010, due to Jewish emigration, their number fell as low as 158,000. A sizeable emigration of other minorities has been enduring, too. The main destinations of emigrants from Russia are the USA (Russians, Jews, Belarusians, Chechens, Meskhetian Turks, Ukrainians and others), Israel (Jews), Germany (Germans and Jews), Poland (Poles), Canada (Finns and Ukrainians), Finland (Finns), France (Jews and Armenians) and the United Kingdom (mainly rich Russians). citation needed citation needed Assimilation (i.e., marrying Russians and having children of such unions counted as Russians) explains the decrease in numbers of Ukrainians, Belarusians and most of the Uralic peoples. The assimilation is reflected in the high median age of these peoples (see the table below), as assimilation is stronger among young people than among old people. The process of assimilation of the Uralic peoples of Russia is probably going on for centuries and is most prominent among the Mordvins (1.4% of the Russian population in 1926 and 0.5% in 2010), the Karelians, Veps and Izhorians. Assimilation on the other hand slowed down the decrease of the number of ethnic Russians. Besides, the decrease of the number of Russians was also slowed down by the immigration of ethnic Russians from the former Soviet republics, especially Central Asia. Similarly, the numbers of Ukrainians, Belarusians, Germans, Jews, and other non autochthonous ethnic groups has also been decreased by emigration to Ukraine, Belarus, Germany, Israel, and so forth, respectively. Peoples of European Russia in the Russian Federation, 1926–2010 Peoples of European Russia in the Russian Federation, 1926–2010 Peoples of the Caucasus Peoples of the Caucasus Peoples of the Caucasus in the Russian Federation, 1926–2010 Peoples of the Caucasus in the Russian Federation, 1926–2010

russia, ethnic, 2010, perspective, historical

Andre Iguodala - Statistiques - Université

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Université

universite, andre, iguodala, statistiques, m

List of Philadelphia Flyers award winners - Team awards - Barry Ashbee Trophy

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Barry Ashbee Trophy First awarded following the 1974–75 season, the Barry Ashbee Trophy is given out to the team's 'outstanding defenseman' as determined by a panel vote consisting of local sportscasters and sportswriters. The trophy is named in honor of Barry Ashbee, an NHL Second Team All Star and the team's best defenseman during the 1973–74 season who suffered a career ending eye injury during Game 4 of the 1974 Stanley Cup Semifinals. Eric Desjardins won the trophy seven times during his Flyers career including six in a row his first six seasons with the Flyers. Kimmo Timonen with five wins and Mark Howe with four wins are the only other Flyers to win the trophy at least three times. Winners of the Barry Ashbee Trophy Winners of the Barry Ashbee Trophy

trophy, ashbee, barry, flyers, team