Tata Steel Chess Tournament - Event crosstables - 2000's - 69th Corus Chess Tournament, grandmaster group C, 13–28 January 2007, Wijk aan Zee, Cat. X (2486)PlayerRating1234567891011121314TotalSBTPR1 GM Michał Krasenkow (Poland)2651Does not appear01½11½111

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Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. 69th Corus Chess Tournament, grandmaster group C, 13–28 January 2007, Wijk aan Zee, Cat. X (2486)PlayerRating1234567891011121314TotalSBTPR1 GM Michał Krasenkow (Poland)2651Does not appear01½11½11111½110½27252 IM Ian Nepomniachtchi (Russia)25871Does not appear½½½½111011111026903 GM Emanuel Berg (Sweden)25860½Does not appear1½1½111½0½½825664 GM Parimarjan Negi (India)2538½½0Does not appear1110½0½1½17½25395 WFM Hou Yifan (China)25090½½0Does not appear11½½1½1½0742.7525146 IM Wouter Spoelman (Netherlands)24140½000Does not appear½1½111½1738.0025217 GM John van der Wiel (Netherlands)2511½0½00½Does not appear1½½½1½½635.5024558 IM Manuel Bosboom (Netherlands)23750001½00Does not appear101½11632.2524669 IM Edwin van Haastert (Netherlands)2391000½½½½0Does not appear½½111631.25246510 IM Nadezhda Kosintseva (Russia)2496010100½1½Does not appear½0105½36.25242911 GM Peng Zhaoqin (Netherlands)243100½½½0½0½½Does not appear1½15½30.00243412 GM Harmen Jonkman (Netherlands)24250010000½010Does not appear114½238113 GM Stellan Brynell (Sweden)2501½0½½½½½000½0Does not appear½4234414 IM Thomas Willemze (Netherlands)239300½010½00100½Does not appear3½2318

Data Source : WIKIPEDIA
Number of Data columns : 20 Number of Data rows : 14
Categories : economy, demography, politics, knowledge

Dataset

Data row number No Name 0 Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Total SB TPR

Download the dataset to see the full list of 14 entries

Data Columns

Name Description Data Type
No Name 0 integer
Player text
Rating integer
1 text
2 text
3 text
4 text
5 text
6 text
7 text
8 text
9 text
10 text
11 text
12 text
13 text
14 text
Total text
SB double precision
TPR integer

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Mourmansk - Population

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Population Recensements (*) ou estimations de la population Évolution démographique

population, mourmansk, wikipedia, recensements, structured

Royal Flying Corps - First World War - Roles and responsibilities

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Roles and responsibilities Wireless telegraphy and photo reconnaissance Wireless telegraphy and photo reconnaissance Later in September, during the First Battle of the Aisne which followed, the RFC made use of wireless telegraphy to assist with artillery targeting and took aerial photographs for the first time.From 16,000 feet a photographic plate could cover some 2 by 3 miles (3.2 km × 4.8 km) of front line in sharp detail. In 1915 Lieutenant Colonel JTC Moore Brabrazon designed the first practical aerial camera. These semi automatic cameras became a high priority for the Corps and photo reconnaissance aircraft were soon operational in numbers with the RFC. The camera was usually fixed to the side of the fuselage, or operated through a hole in the floor. The increasing need for surveys of the western front and its approaches, made extensive aerial photography essential. Aerial photographs were exclusively used in compiling the British Army's highly detailed 1:10,000 scale maps introduced in mid 1915. Such were advances in aerial photography that the entire Somme Offensive of July—November 1916 was based on the RFC's air shot photographs. Artillery observation Artillery observation One of the initial and most important uses of RFC aircraft was observing artillery fire behind the enemy front line at targets that could not be seen by ground observers. The fall of shot of artillery fire were easy enough for the pilot to see, providing he was looking in the right place at the right time; apart from this the problem was communicating corrections to the battery. Development of procedures had been the responsibility of No 3 Squadron and the Royal Artillery in 1912–13. These methods usually depended on the pilot being tasked to observe the fire against a specific target and report the fall of shot relative to the target, the battery adjusted their aim, fired and the process was repeated until the target was effectively engaged. One early communication method was for the flier to write a note and drop it to the ground where it could be recovered but various visual signalling methods were also used. This meant the pilots had to observe the battery to see when it fired and see if it had laid out a visual signal using white marker panels on the ground. The Royal Engineers' Air Battalion had pioneered experiments with wireless telegraphy in airships and aircraft before the RFC was created. Unfortunately the early transmitters weighed 75 pounds and filled a seat in the cockpit. This meant that the pilot had to fly the aircraft, navigate, observe the fall of the shells and transmit the results by morse code by himself. Also, the wireless in the aircraft could not receive. Originally only a special Wireless Flight attached to No. 4 Squadron RFC had the wireless equipment. Eventually this flight was expanded into No. 9 Squadron under Major Hugh Dowding. However, in early 1915 the Sterling lightweight wireless became available and was widely used. In 1915 each corps in the BEF was assigned a RFC squadron solely for artillery observation and reconnaissance duties. The transmitter filled the cockpit normally used by the observer and a trailing wire antenna was used which had to be reeled in prior to landing. Wireless Flight The RFC's wireless experiments under Major Herbert Musgrave, included research into how wireless telegraphy could be used by military aircraft. However, the most important officers in wireless development were Lieutenants Donald Lewis and Baron James in the RFC HQ wireless unit formed in France in September 1914. They developed both equipment and procedures in operational sorties. An important development was the Zone Call procedure in 1915. By this time maps were 'squared' and a target location could be reported from the air using alphanumeric characters transmitted in Morse code. Batteries were allocated a Zone, typically a quarter of a mapsheet, and it was the duty of the RFC signallers on the ground beside the battery command post to pick out calls for fire in their battery's Zone. Once ranging started the airman reported the position of the ranging round using the clock code, the battery adjusted their firing data and fired again, and the process was repeated until the pilot observed an on target or close round. The battery commander then decided how much to fire at the target. The results were mixed. Observing artillery fire, even from above, requires training and skill. Within artillery units, ground observers received mentoring to develop their skill, which was not available to RFC aircrew. There were undoubtedly some very skilled artillery observers in the RFC, but there were many who were not and there was a tendency for 'optimism bias' – reported on target rounds that weren't. The procedures were also time consuming. The ground stations were generally attached to heavy artillery units, such as Royal Garrison Artillery Siege Batteries, and were manned by RFC wireless operators, such as Henry Tabor. These wireless operators had to fend for themselves as their squadrons were situated some distance away and they were not posted to the battery they were colocated with. This led to concerns as to who had responsibility for them and in November 1916 squadron commanders had to be reminded 'that it is their duty to keep in close touch with the operators attached to their command, and to make all necessary arrangements for supplying them with blankets, clothing, pay, etc' (Letter from Headquarters, 2nd Brigade RFC dated 18 November 1916 – Public Records Office AIR/1/864) The wireless operators' work was often carried out under heavy artillery fire in makeshift dug outs. The artillery batteries were important targets and antennas were a lot less robust than the guns, hence prone to damage requiring immediate repair. As well as taking down and interpreting the numerous signals coming in from the aircraft, the operator had to communicate back to the aircraft by means of cloth strips laid out on the ground or a signalling lamp to give visual confirmation that the signals had been received. The wireless communication was one way as no receiver was mounted in the aircraft and the ground station could not transmit. Details from: 'Henry Tabor's 1916 War Diary'..mw parser output cite.citation{font style:inherit}.mw parser output .citation q{quotes:''''''''''''}.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock free a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock green.svg/9px Lock green.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock limited a,.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock registration a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock gray alt 2.svg/9px Lock gray alt 2.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock subscription a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock red alt 2.svg/9px Lock red alt 2.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output .cs1 subscription,.mw parser output .cs1 registration{color:#555}.mw parser output .cs1 subscription span,.mw parser output .cs1 registration span{border bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw parser output .cs1 ws icon a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource logo.svg/12px Wikisource logo.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output code.cs1 code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw parser output .cs1 hidden error{display:none;font size:100%}.mw parser output .cs1 visible error{font size:100%}.mw parser output .cs1 maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin left:0.3em}.mw parser output .cs1 subscription,.mw parser output .cs1 registration,.mw parser output .cs1 format{font size:95%}.mw parser output .cs1 kern left,.mw parser output .cs1 kern wl left{padding left:0.2em}.mw parser output .cs1 kern right,.mw parser output .cs1 kern wl right{padding right:0.2em} 'Henry Tabor's 1916 War Diary'. .mw parser output cite.citation{font style:inherit}.mw parser output .citation q{quotes:''''''''''''}.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock free a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock green.svg/9px Lock green.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock limited a,.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock registration a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock gray alt 2.svg/9px Lock gray alt 2.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output .citation .cs1 lock subscription a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock red alt 2.svg/9px Lock red alt 2.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output .cs1 subscription,.mw parser output .cs1 registration{color:#555}.mw parser output .cs1 subscription span,.mw parser output .cs1 registration span{border bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw parser output .cs1 ws icon a{background:url('//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource logo.svg/12px Wikisource logo.svg.png')no repeat;background position:right .1em center}.mw parser output code.cs1 code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw parser output .cs1 hidden error{display:none;font size:100%}.mw parser output .cs1 visible error{font size:100%}.mw parser output .cs1 maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin left:0.3em}.mw parser output .cs1 subscription,.mw parser output .cs1 registration,.mw parser output .cs1 format{font size:95%}.mw parser output .cs1 kern left,.mw parser output .cs1 kern wl left{padding left:0.2em}.mw parser output .cs1 kern right,.mw parser output .cs1 kern wl right{padding right:0.2em} By May 1916, 306 aircraft and 542 ground stations were equipped with wireless. Covert operations Covert operations An unusual mission for the RFC was the delivery of spies behind enemy lines. The first mission took place on the morning of 13 September 1915 and was not a success. The plane crashed, the pilot and spy were badly injured and they were both captured (two years later the pilot, Captain T.W. Mulcahy Morgan escaped and returned to England). Later missions were more successful. In addition to delivering the spies the RFC was also responsible for keeping them supplied with the carrier pigeons that were used to send reports back to base. In 1916 a Special Duty Flight was formed as part of the Headquarters Wing to handle these and other unusual assignments. Aerial bombardment Aerial bombardment The obvious potential for aerial bombardment of the enemy was not lost on the RFC, and despite the poor payload of early war aircraft, bombing missions were undertaken. Front line squadrons (at the prompting of the more inventive pilots) devised several methods of carrying, aiming and dropping bombs. Lieutenant Conran of No 3 Squadron attacked an enemy troop column by dropping hand grenades over the side of his cockpit; the noise of the grenades caused the horses to stampede. At No 6 Squadron, Captain Louis Strange managed to destroy two canvas covered trucks with home made petrol bombs. In March 1915 a bombing raid was flown, with Captain Strange flying a modified Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c, to carry four 20 lb Cooper bombs on wing racks released by pulling a cable fitted in the cockpit. Attacking Courtrai railway station. Strange approached from low level and hit a troop train causing 75 casualties. The same day Captain Carmichael of No 5 Squadron dropped a 100 lb bomb from a Martinsyde S1 on the railway junction at Menin. Days later, Lieutenant William Barnard Rhodes Moorhouse of No 2 Squadron was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross after bombing Courtrai station in a BE2c. In October 1917 No 41 Wing was formed to attack strategic targets in Germany. Consisting of No 55 Squadron (Airco DH.4), No 100 (Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2b) and No 16 (Naval) Squadron (Handley Page 0/100) the wing was based at Ochey commanded by Lt Colonel Cyril Newall. Its first attack was on Saarbrücken on 17 October with 11 DH 4s and a week later nine Handley Page O/100s carried out a night attack against factories in Saarbrücken, while 16 F.E.2bs bombed railways nearby. Four aircraft failed to return. The wing was expanded with the later addition of Nos 99 and 104 Squadrons, both flying the DH 4 into the Independent Air Force. Ground attack—army support Ground attack—army support Aircraft were increasingly engaged in ground attack operations as the war wore on, aimed at disrupting enemy forces at or near the front line and during offensives. While formal tactical bombing raids were planned and usually directed at specific targets, ground attack was usually carried out by individual pilots or small flights against targets of opportunity. Although the fitted machine guns were the primary armament for ground attack, bomb racks holding 20 lb Cooper bombs were soon fitted to many single seat aircraft. Ground attack sorties were carried out at very low altitude and were often highly effective, in spite of the primitive nature of the weaponry involved, compared with later conflicts. The moral effect on ground troops subjected to air attack could even be decisive. Such operations became increasingly hazardous for the attacking aircraft, as one hit from small arms fire could bring an aircraft down and troops learned deflection shooting to hit relatively slow moving enemy aeroplanes. During the Battle of Messines in June 1917, Trenchard ordered the British crews to fly low over the lines and strafe all available targets. Techniques for Army and RFC co operation quickly evolved and improved and during the Third Battle of Ypres over 300 aircraft from 14 RFC squadrons, including the Sopwith Camel, armed with four 9 kg (20 lb) bombs, constantly raided enemy trenches, troop concentrations, artillery positions and strongholds in co operation with tanks and infantry. The cost to the RFC was high, with a loss rate of ground attack aircraft approaching 30 percent. The first British production armoured type, the Sopwith Salamander, did not see service during the First World War. Home defence Home defence In the UK the RFC Home Establishment was not only responsible for training air and ground crews and preparing squadrons to deploy to France, but providing squadrons for home defence, countering the German Zeppelin raids and later Gotha raids. The RFC (and the Royal Naval Air Service) initially had limited success against the German raids, largely through the problem of locating the attackers and having aircraft of sufficient performance to reach the operating altitude of the German raiders. RFC Home Establishment With the bulk of the operational squadrons engaged in France few could be spared for home defence in the UK. Therefore, training squadrons were called on to supply home defence aircraft and aircrews for the duration of the war. Night flying and defence missions were often flown by instructors in aircraft deemed worn out and often obsolete for front line service, although the pilots selected as instructors were often among the most experienced in the RFC. The RFC officially took over the role of Home Defence in December 1915 and at that time had 10 permanent airfields. By December 1916 there were 11 RFC home defence squadrons:

and, first, war, royal, flying

Producers Guild Film Awards - Film Awards - Best Dialogues

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Best Dialogues

film, dialogues, best, awards, producers