- Phases of the Moon

Download in Excel, CSV or JSON

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Phases of the Moon In western culture, the four principal phases of the Moon are new moon, first quarter, full moon, and third quarter (also known as last quarter). These are the instances when the Moon's ecliptic longitude and the Sun's ecliptic longitude differ by 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°, respectively. Each of these phases occur at slightly different times when viewed from different points on Earth. During the intervals between principal phases, the Moon's apparent shape is either crescent or gibbous. These shapes, and the periods when the Moon shows them, are called the intermediate phases and last one quarter of a synodic month, or 7.38 days, on average. However, their durations vary slightly because the Moon's orbit is rather elliptical, so the satellite's orbital speed is not constant. The descriptor waxing is used for an intermediate phase when the Moon's apparent shape is thickening, from new to full moon, and waning when the shape is thinning. four principal phases intermediate phases waxing waning The eight principal and intermediate phases are given the following names, in sequential order: Principal and intermediate phases of the MoonMoon PhaseNorthern HemisphereSouthern HemisphereVisibilityMid phase standard timeAverage moonrise timeAverage moonset timeNorthern HemisphereSouthern HemispherePhotograph(view fromNorthern Hemisphere)New MoonDisc completely in Sun's shadow (lit by earthshine only)Invisible (too close to Sun)Noon6 am6 pmNot visible Waxing crescentRight side, 0.1%–49.9% lit discLeft side, 0.1–49.9% lit discLate morning to post dusk3 pm9 am9 pmFirst QuarterRight side, 50% lit discLeft side, 50% lit discAfternoon and early evening6 pmNoonMidnightWaxing gibbousRight side, 50.1%–99.9% lit discLeft side, 50.1%–99.9% lit discLate afternoon and most of night9 pm3 pm3 amFull Moon100% illuminated discSunset to sunrise (all night)Midnight6 pm6 amWaning gibbousLeft side, 99.9%–50.1% lit discRight side, 99.9%–50.1% lit discMost of night and early morning3 am9 pm9 amLast QuarterLeft side, 50% lit discRight side, 50% lit discLate night and morning6 amMidnightNoonWaning crescentLeft side, 49.9%–0.1% lit discRight side, 49.9%–0.1% lit discPre dawn to early afternoon9 am3 am3 pm

Data Source : WIKIPEDIA
Number of Data columns : 7 Number of Data rows : 8
Categories : economy, demography, politics, knowledge

Dataset

Data row number Moon Phase Northern Hemisphere Southern Hemisphere Visibility Mid-phase standard time Average moonrise time Average moonset time

Download the dataset to see the full list of 8 entries

Data Columns

Name Description Data Type
Moon Phase text
Northern Hemisphere text
Southern Hemisphere text
Visibility text
Mid-phase standard time text
Average moonrise time text
Average moonset time text

Other datasets published on Basedig

2008 Florida Marlins season - Regular season - Season standings

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Season standings

season, standings, marlins, 2008, florida

- Results - Group A

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Group A Table Table

group, results, wikipedia, table, from

Interval (music) - Classification - Enharmonic intervals

From WIKIPEDIA

Structured data parsed from Wikipedia. Enharmonic intervals Play (help·info) Play (help·info) help info Two intervals are considered enharmonic, or enharmonically equivalent, if they both contain the same pitches spelled in different ways; that is, if the notes in the two intervals are themselves enharmonically equivalent. Enharmonic intervals span the same number of semitones. enharmonic enharmonically equivalent For example, the four intervals listed in the table below are all enharmonically equivalent, because the notes F♯ and G♭ indicate the same pitch, and the same is true for A♯ and B♭. All these intervals span four semitones. ♯ ♯ ♭ ♭ ♯ ♯ ♭ ♭

intervals, enharmonic, interval, semitones, classification